URL path: Index page // Anti-Neuronal Antibodies

Anti-Neuronal Antibodies

Screening for the presence of antinuclear antibodies is used in the following cases:

  • In serological screening of patients with undetermined etiology of undiagnosed neurological disorder, especially in those patients with known cancer risk factors.
  • Focused search for potential cancers
  • Investigating neurological symptoms that occur during or after cancer treatment that cannot be explained by the presence of possible metastases
  • The differentiation of autoimmune neuropathies from the neurotoxic effects of anticancer chemotherapy
  • Monitoring of the immunological status of anti-nerve antibodies in cancer patients during anti-cancer therapy
  • In the detection of early signs of cancer recurrence in previously seronegative anti-nerve antibody patients

Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes (PNSs) are rare syndromes caused by or associated with an underlying neoplasm. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes do not occur as a result of the direct effect of the tumor on nerve tissue cells, but most are thought to be caused by the body's immune response to various oncogonary antigens. These are antigens that are found in both neoplastic cells and normal cells of the nerve tissue and are recognized as foreign, thereby causing the production of autoantibodies (antitumor antibodies) that attack both tumors and parts of the nervous system.

This "attack" of autoantibodies results in progressive neurological damage. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes can affect many parts of the nervous system, and unlike most progressive neurodegenerative disorders, they usually have a rapid onset of symptoms. Patients may develop severe neurological disorder within a few hours such as, for example, aesthetic neuropathy, idiopathic cerebrovascular dysfunction or complaints of vision disorders (deaths). In addition, many antibodies are usually associated with specific tumors. Thus, the presence of a particular autoantibody may also indicate the potential underlying tumor.

Detection of antibodies against oncogene antigens indicates the diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndrome and helps to focus research on the underlying tumor in specific organs.

The following table summarizes the antinuclear antibodies, the associated paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, and the most commonly underlying neoplasms.

 

Anti-Nuclear Anti-Hu Antibody (ANNA-1)

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

  • Aesthetic Neuropathy and Autonomic Nervous System Neuropathy
  • Brain Ataxia
  • Encephalomyelitis
  • Malignant encephalitis

More commonly associated neoplasms

  • Small cell lung cancer
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Extrapulmonary small cell cancer
Nuclear Anti-Yo Antibody (Purkinje Cells)

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

  • Brain Ataxia

More commonly associated neoplasms

  • Breast cancer
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Uterine cancer

 

Anti-Neuronal Anti-Ri Antibody (ANNA-2, Anti-Nova-1)

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

  • Stem encephalitis
  • Brain Ataxia

More commonly associated neoplasms

  • Breast cancer
  • Small cell lung cancer
  • Thyroid cancer

 

Anti-Nuclear Anti-CV2 Antibody (CRMP5)

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

  • Aesthetic and Aesthetic Motor Neuropathy
  • Encephalomyelitis
  • Brain Ataxia
  • Malignant Systemic Encephalitis
  • Autonomic Nervous System Neuropathy
  • Chorea

More commonly associated neoplasms

  • Small cell lung cancer
  • Thymoma

Anti-Nuclear Anti-Amphiphysin Antibody

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

  • Syndrome characterized by muscle stiffness and contractions
  • Various symptoms

More commonly associated neoplasms

  • Small cell lung cancer
  • Breast cancer

 

Anti-Nuclear Anti-Ma1 & Anti-Ma2 Antibodies (Ta)

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

  • Malignant encephalitis
  • Stem encephalitis
  • Brain Ataxia

More commonly associated neoplasms

  • Testicular cancer
  • Lung cancers

 

 

 

Important Note

Laboratory test results are the most important parameter for the diagnosis and monitoring of all pathological conditions. 70%-80% of diagnostic decisions are based on laboratory tests. Correct interpretation of laboratory results allows a doctor to distinguish "healthy" from "diseased".

Laboratory test results should not be interpreted from the numerical result of a single analysis. Test results should be interpreted in relation to each individual case and family history, clinical findings and the results of other laboratory tests and information. Your personal physician should explain the importance of your test results.

At Diagnostiki Athinon we answer any questions you may have about the test you perform in our laboratory and we contact your doctor to get the best possible medical care.


Additional information
Share it